How much does a bespoke suit cost?

The straight answer is anywhere from £2000 to £5000+. An investment in bespoke is essentially an investment in time. The more time that goes into the construction and fitting of the suit the better the outcome. Depending on where you order from you will also be paying for higher rents, marketing and other costs than if you order from an ‘off-row’ tailor. Similarly the quality of your cloth will have a huge impact on the final cost. An average of 60 hours goes into the construction of each suit and this can easily rise to 80 hours or more.

Below is a little more detail on each area that makes up the total cost of the suit.

Consultation, measuring and cutting

The perfect fit starts with an in depth consultation and correct measurIMG_2820ements. Understanding the client’s body shape, posture, style and usage requirements are essential towards choosing a flattering design and translating all these into a well cut pattern. This is where the cutter’s expertise and experience are worth every penny. More than 50 detailed measurements are required to draft a well fitting pattern and these are completely unique to each person.

Coat making

After the suit is cut from cloth it is assembled. The defining feature of a bespoke coat (more commonly known as the jacket) is the use of a floating canvas to give it shape and body. Conventional garment construction uses fusible (glued) interlinings which deteriorate over time. Chest canvasses are shaped by stitching them to the cloth following the curves of the body. They will also mold themselves to the wearer’s body through wear.

Trouser making

In my experience great fitting trousers are the holy grail in any woman’s wardrobe. And achieving that great fit is indeed very difficult. There are so many aspects to get right: the proportion of rise, crotch length, hip and abdomen to each other, etc. Bespoke trousers are usually fully lined with handmade buttonholes and waist adjusters.

Fittings

Scissors and pins. Dara Ford Bespoke TailoringIn order to achieve a great looking suit several fittings are needed. I’d say on average 3-4, but it could be more depending on the body shape and complexity of the design.
Each fitting can easily run to 1.5 hours, but it is time well spent as this is really where the magic happens. Seemingly small adjustments can have a big impact on the fit and comfort so it is important to get each stage right.

Cloth

A standard wool worsted starts at about £40-50 per metre, cashmere qualities can be around £300-400 per metre and at the top end there is Vicuna at £3500 per metre! You can even get cloth that is woven with gold. For a trouser suit you need about 4 metres of cloth so you can see how the cost can quickly escalate depending on what you choose.

Trimmings

Last but not least are the trimmings. These are made up of the canvasses used in the suit as well as silk threads, mother-of-pearl or horn buttons, silk bindings, collar melton, linings, etc. On average this will come to £100.

Finishing & after care

Hand stitched button holes and linings, embroidered initials, expert pressing of the final suit. An assessment of the final result after a few weeks once the suit has ‘settled’ is also standard.

 

So there you have it – the makings of a bespoke suit. Certainly an investment, but one that should last you for decades if not generations. Please find my own price guide below:

Bespoke

  • Skirt suit – £ 1595
  • Trouser suit – £ 1725
  • Dress – £ 1150
  • Jacket – £ 1250
  • Trousers – £ 495
  • Skirt – £ 395

All prices are quoted without materials.

To book your free consultation please head over to www.daraford.com. I would be delighted to tell you more and to answer any questions you might have.

 

 

 

 

 

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